August 28, 2014
mcnallyperiodicals:

ISRAEL and PALESTINE. Harper’s Magazine, September 2014. “Where to go from here.” A forum taken from a conversation at the Jerusalem YMCA on June 15th.With Bernard Avishai, Dani Dayan, Forsan Hussein, Eva Illouz, Bassim Khoury, Erel Margalit, Danny Rubinstein, and Khalil Shikaki.
PART ONE: “We live so close to each other, yet we know so little about each other.”
PART TWO: “We are not a fort. We are a hub.”
PART THREE: “Palestine is not Jordan.”
PART FOUR: “The Kerry Intifada.”

Matt seconds Periodicals: recommended reading.

mcnallyperiodicals:

ISRAEL and PALESTINE. Harper’s Magazine, September 2014. “Where to go from here.” A forum taken from a conversation at the Jerusalem YMCA on June 15th.

With Bernard Avishai, Dani Dayan, Forsan Hussein, Eva Illouz, Bassim Khoury, Erel Margalit, Danny Rubinstein, and Khalil Shikaki.

PART ONE: “We live so close to each other, yet we know so little about each other.”

PART TWO: “We are not a fort. We are a hub.”

PART THREE: “Palestine is not Jordan.”

PART FOUR: “The Kerry Intifada.”

Matt seconds Periodicals: recommended reading.

August 28, 2014
Join Richard Flanagan on September 3rd to launch The Narrow Road to the Deep North, his Booker-nominated novel based on the experience of an Australian man in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp on the 1943 Thai-Burma death railway. Oscillating between scenes of relentless violence and the desolations of war’s aftermath, the novel preserves, improbably, the possibility of redemption—in love, in friendship, in literature. The Guardian calls it “a high point in an already distinguished career” for Flanagan, whose other books include Gould’s Book of Fish and The Sound of One Hand Clapping. Flanagan will be joined in conversation by novelist Patrick McGrath (Constance), who calls The Narrow Road to the Deep North “a big, magnificent novel of passion and horror.”
Landon is currently reading The Narrow Road to the Deep North. "So far, it’s good," he says. "Lots of malaria." 

Join Richard Flanagan on September 3rd to launch The Narrow Road to the Deep North, his Booker-nominated novel based on the experience of an Australian man in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp on the 1943 Thai-Burma death railway. Oscillating between scenes of relentless violence and the desolations of war’s aftermath, the novel preserves, improbably, the possibility of redemption—in love, in friendship, in literature. The Guardian calls it “a high point in an already distinguished career” for Flanagan, whose other books include Gould’s Book of Fish and The Sound of One Hand Clapping. Flanagan will be joined in conversation by novelist Patrick McGrath (Constance), who calls The Narrow Road to the Deep North “a big, magnificent novel of passion and horror.”

Landon is currently reading The Narrow Road to the Deep North"So far, it’s good," he says. "Lots of malaria." 

August 28, 2014
On September 2nd, join Justin Taylor, whose newest collection of stories, Flings, Alice Nutting describes as possessing a “smarting beauty” which “rewards the reader with revelation time and time again,” and his friend Adam Wilson (What’s Important is Feeling), for a conversation about the existential crises that plague their characters. Part of McNally Jackson’s Literary BFFs series, hosted by David Gutowski (a.k.a. Largehearted Boy).

On September 2nd, join Justin Taylor, whose newest collection of stories, Flings, Alice Nutting describes as possessing a “smarting beauty” which “rewards the reader with revelation time and time again,” and his friend Adam Wilson (What’s Important is Feeling), for a conversation about the existential crises that plague their characters. Part of McNally Jackson’s Literary BFFs series, hosted by David Gutowski (a.k.a. Largehearted Boy).

August 26, 2014

Our staff loves Spector Books' Four Times Through the Labyrinth. Pictured above: Ames staff picks it. And here Fiona reviews it:

Through the Labyrinth performs entanglement. One slide will connect to another two lectures later. Sometimes images are repeated. Pantomiming its subject, the book’s contents diverge and loop.

David’s game for it too. 

August 26, 2014
Here is the email Cristin wrote to the bookstore's staff today.

Cristin crushing how well Kate is crushing it.

mcnallykids:

image

You’ve all spent enough time with me at this point to know I’d rather chew glass than pretend to like something that I don’t, so I hope you realize that what I’m about to say is not just blowing smoke up Kate’s ass to be nice.

Kate’s new book, Greenglass House, is out today, and it is easily one of the best middle grade novels of 2014. In case you need a second opinion, the head of children’s collections for the NYPL has already named it a strong contender for the Newbery, which is the children’s book equivalent of Scorsese going “someone should give that kid an Oscar.”

There’s a copy of the book on the lunch counter in the office labeled STAFF COPY- READ ME. I would love for you to read a few pages (or more) as your break/ section time allows, and for you to join me in enthusiastically recommending it to our middle grade (ages 8ish-12ish) customers.

Kate’s launch party is here at the store tonight. There’s cake involved.

-CRISTIN 

August 25, 2014
TONIGHT! 7PM!

TONIGHT! 7PM!

August 21, 2014
"Men [and women—Ed.] are not suffering from the lack of good literature, good art, good theatre, good music, but from that which has made it impossible for these to become manifest. In short, they are suffering from the silent, shameful conspiracy (the more shameful since it is unacknowledged) which has bound them together as enemies of art and artist. They are suffering from the act, repeated daily, of keeping up the pretense that they can go their way, lead their lives, without art. They never dream—or they behave as if they never realize—that the reason why they feel sterile, frustrated and joyless is because art (and with it the artist) has been ruled out of their lives. For every artist who has been assassinated thus (unwittingly?) thousands of ordinary citizens, who might have known a normal joyous life, are condemned to lead the purgatorial existence of neurotics, psychotics, schizophrenics. No, the man who is about to blow his top does not have to fix his eye on the Iliad, the Divine Comedy, or any other great model; he has only to give us, in his own language, the saga of his woes and tribulations, the saga of his non-existentialism.” 
—Henry Miller, from Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch.
[NOTE: Pictured above is the ceiling of the Henry Miller Memorial Library, in Big Sur. Looks familiar, no?]

"Men [and womenEd.are not suffering from the lack of good literature, good art, good theatre, good music, but from that which has made it impossible for these to become manifest. In short, they are suffering from the silent, shameful conspiracy (the more shameful since it is unacknowledged) which has bound them together as enemies of art and artist. They are suffering from the act, repeated daily, of keeping up the pretense that they can go their way, lead their lives, without art. They never dream—or they behave as if they never realizethat the reason why they feel sterile, frustrated and joyless is because art (and with it the artist) has been ruled out of their lives. For every artist who has been assassinated thus (unwittingly?) thousands of ordinary citizens, who might have known a normal joyous life, are condemned to lead the purgatorial existence of neurotics, psychotics, schizophrenics. No, the man who is about to blow his top does not have to fix his eye on the Iliad, the Divine Comedy, or any other great model; he has only to give us, in his own language, the saga of his woes and tribulations, the saga of his non-existentialism.” 

—Henry Miller, from Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch.

[NOTE: Pictured above is the ceiling of the Henry Miller Memorial Library, in Big Sur. Looks familiar, no?]

August 20, 2014
JUST LEAKED: a photo still from the upcoming film adaptation of Murakami’s new novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.

JUST LEAKED: a photo still from the upcoming film adaptation of Murakami’s new novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.

August 18, 2014
Our new brew is Sightglass Coffee. Makes a damn good latte. And everything else with coffee in it.

Our new brew is Sightglass Coffee. Makes a damn good latte. And everything else with coffee in it.

August 15, 2014

Baby storytime is today, and every Friday, at 4:00 but we can’t find this book.

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