July 30, 2014
Marguerite Duras on telling absolutely no one anything about what you’re writing, ever, until it’s done.

Words that equally support genius and mania: 

"I couldn’t talk about it, because the slightest intrusion into the book, the slightest ‘objective’ opinion would have erased everything, of that book. […] The illusion one has—entirely correct—of being the only one to have written what one has written, no matter if it’s worthless or marvelous. And when I read my reviews, most of the time I responded to the fact that people said it was like nothing else. In other words, that it reconnected with the initial solitude of the author.”

—Marguerite Duras, Writing.

July 30, 2014
"This insistence on everyone’s right to full and free human satisfaction was at the center of [Ellen Willis’s] politics from the get-go. How women were denied this satisfaction became her subject."

Over in Dissent, an excellent review by Emily Greenhouse of The Essential Ellen Willis, which, dare we say it, is…essential.

July 29, 2014
mcnallyperiodicals:

We’re not quite sure what IDEOLOGIE ("a triumph of style") is, but we have it (and kinda dig it): "A spectre is haunting the world—-the spectre of fashion. All the powers of white magic have entered into an unholy alliance to exorcise this spectre, to capture it, to learn to cast a glamour. Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding approach? In warfare, one’s helmet should have a panache. What we lack in veracity, we make up in ideologie." Compadres of n+1.

Get it, get on it, get with it.

mcnallyperiodicals:

We’re not quite sure what IDEOLOGIE ("a triumph of style") is, but we have it (and kinda dig it): "A spectre is haunting the world—-the spectre of fashion. All the powers of white magic have entered into an unholy alliance to exorcise this spectre, to capture it, to learn to cast a glamour. Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding approach? In warfare, one’s helmet should have a panache. What we lack in veracity, we make up in ideologie." Compadres of n+1.

Get it, get on it, get with it.

July 24, 2014
Just arrived: the first English translation of Pasolini’s revolutionary screenplay for his unmade film about the life of St. Paul, from Verso. Pairs well with Piketty, Agamben, or that vintage Ocean Pacific swag you nabbed at Buffalo Exchange.Oh, and a nice piece in The New Statesmen about Paul’s place in Pasolini’s thought.

Just arrived: the first English translation of Pasolini’s revolutionary screenplay for his unmade film about the life of St. Paul, from Verso. Pairs well with Piketty, Agamben, or that vintage Ocean Pacific swag you nabbed at Buffalo Exchange.

Oh, and a nice piece in The New Statesmen about Paul’s place in Pasolini’s thought.

July 24, 2014
Geoff Dyer on Buying Bullets

image


If there’s one thing Geoff Dyer does well, it’s imagine what it would be like if Samuel Beckett scripted a film about American gangsters to be directed by David Mamet.

Read More

July 24, 2014
lastnightsreading:

Emma Straub at McNally-Jackson, 7/23/14

lastnightsreading:

Emma Straub at McNally-Jackson, 7/23/14

July 18, 2014
Javier Marías on (not) writing novels.

Javier Marías for The Independent, disclosing the “first and last” reason to write a novel (along with seven reasons not to):

Writing novels allows the novelist to spend much of his time in a fictional world, which is really the only or at least the most bearable place to be. This means that he can live in the realm of what might have been and never was, and therefore in the land of what is still possible, of what will always be about to happen, what has not yet been dismissed as having happened already or because everyone knows it will never happen. The so-called realistic novelist, who, when he writes, remains firmly installed in the real world, has confused his role with that of the historian or journalist or documentary-maker.

I cannot help but wonder, in the middle of our Summer of Struggle, whether the defense of the purely fictional against remaining “firmly installed in the real world,” isn’t oblique commentary on the fictionalization of lived experience, emblematized most recently by The-Norwegian-Who-Shall-Not-Be-Named?

Marías’ full piece here

July 18, 2014

"Words, Don’t come easy," reads the front inside flap of the latest, Spring 2014, issue of F.R.David. A biannual* journal published by de Appel arts centre in Amsterdam, and edited by designer/writer/artist Will Holder with Ann de Meester and Dieter Roelstraete, F.R.David is “concerned with the management of reading and writing in contemporary art practice,” which to reader-me is something of a misnomer, sounds like a grant-money line. I’d say it’s more about language as is it connects to the visual: words as objects, words as image-making (like, in the mind’s eye, like poetry), and words as used to describe, interpret, etc. the visual, art.

CLOG is a quarterly journal of architecture. Each issue looks at a specific theme from multiple points of view and through various means. This means introductory glossaries as well as critical essays, short and long form work, and as much attention paid to visuals as to text. The idea is to provide a well-rounded but precise and contained take on a given topic. Past topics have included Miami, Apple, Sci-fi, and Brutalism. The latest is on Rem Koolhaas. The one just before that is Prisons.  

Fiona recommending the journals F.R. David and CLOG, both stocked at our shop, at ALLDAYEVERYDAY. Read more here and here.

12:03pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZDtOFy1LqmMi8
  
Filed under: CLOG F.R. David 
July 17, 2014
We’re so very looking forward to a cool evening next Wednesday with literary BFFs Emma Straub and Edan Lepucki. Straub’s new novel, The Vacationers, is Cristin’s “new favorite book for grownups,” and “the book girls in cute sundresses will be reading on the subway all summer” (true!). Meanwhile, Lepucki’s debut, California, has quite a few fans, too, including Sherman Alexie and Steven Colbert. Frozen piña coladas and post-apocalyptic-strength sunscreen optional. 

We’re so very looking forward to a cool evening next Wednesday with literary BFFs Emma Straub and Edan Lepucki. Straub’s new novel, The Vacationers, is Cristin’s “new favorite book for grownups,” and “the book girls in cute sundresses will be reading on the subway all summer” (true!). Meanwhile, Lepucki’s debut, California, has quite a few fans, too, including Sherman Alexie and Steven Colbert. Frozen piña coladas and post-apocalyptic-strength sunscreen optional. 

July 17, 2014
newyorker:

Sarah Larson remembers helping a lost Elaine Stritch in Central Park: http://nyr.kr/1mYQxFa

“After a while, I felt like a creep for not acknowledging that I knew who she was, and I said, ‘By the way, I think you’re terrific.’
‘Thank you!’ she shouted. ‘You know, fans recognize me all over the place. But the second you need anything, they’re never around! They’re like the police!’”

Photograph: Todd Heisler/The New York Times/Redux

newyorker:

Sarah Larson remembers helping a lost Elaine Stritch in Central Park: http://nyr.kr/1mYQxFa

“After a while, I felt like a creep for not acknowledging that I knew who she was, and I said, ‘By the way, I think you’re terrific.’

Thank you!’ she shouted. ‘You know, fans recognize me all over the place. But the second you need anything, they’re never around! They’re like the police!’”

Photograph: Todd Heisler/The New York Times/Redux

(Source: newyorker.com)

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