March 21, 2014
The Flamethrowers 2: THE BLAZING WORLD
With The Blazing World, internationally best-selling author Siri Hustvedt returns to the New York art world mapped in Rachel Kushner’s The Flamethrowers.
The year was 1975 and Reno—so-called because of the place of her birth—had come to New York intent on turning her fascination with motorcycles and speed into art. Her arrival coincided with an explosion of activity in the art world—artists had colonized a deserted and industrial SoHo, staging actions in the East Village, which blurred the line between life and art. Reno met a group of dreamers and raconteurs who submitted her to a sentimental education of sorts.  Ardent, vulnerable, and bold, she began an affair with an artist named Sandro Valera, the semi-estranged scion of an Italian tire and motorcycle empire. When they visited Sandro’s family home in Italy, Reno fell in with members of the radical movement that overtook Italy in the seventies. Betrayal sent her reeling into a clandestine undertow.
Set four decades later, The Blazing World tells the provocative story of New York-based artist Harriet Burden. After years of watching her work ignored or dismissed by critics, Burden conducts an experiment she calls “Maskings” she presents her own art behind three male masks, concealing her female identity. 
The three solo shows are successful, but when Burden finally steps forward triumphantly to reveal herself as the artist behind the exhibitions, there are critics who doubt her. The public scandal turns on the final exhibition, initially shown as the work of acclaimed artist Rune, who denies Burden’s role in its creation. What no one doubts, however, is that the two artists were intensely involved with each other. As Burden’s journals reveal, she and Rune found themselves locked in a charged and dangerous game that ended with the man’s bizarre death. 
Ingeniously presented as a collection of texts compiled after Burden’s death, The Blazing World unfolds from multiple perspectives. The exuberant Burden speaks—in all her joy and fury—through extracts from her own notebooks, while critics, fans, family members, and others offer their own conflicting opinions of who she was, and where the truth lies. 
From one of the most ambitious and internationally renowned writers of her generation, The Blazing World is a polyphonic tour de force. An intricately conceived, diabolical puzzle, it explores the deceptive powers of prejudice, money, fame, and desire. Emotionally intense, intellectually rigorous, ironic, and playful, Hustvedt’s new novel follows in the great wake of Kusher’s The Flamethrowers, with its engaging exploration of the mystique of the feminine, the fake, the terrorist. 

The Flamethrowers 2: THE BLAZING WORLD

With The Blazing World, internationally best-selling author Siri Hustvedt returns to the New York art world mapped in Rachel Kushner’s The Flamethrowers.

The year was 1975 and Reno—so-called because of the place of her birth—had come to New York intent on turning her fascination with motorcycles and speed into art. Her arrival coincided with an explosion of activity in the art world—artists had colonized a deserted and industrial SoHo, staging actions in the East Village, which blurred the line between life and art. Reno met a group of dreamers and raconteurs who submitted her to a sentimental education of sorts.  Ardent, vulnerable, and bold, she began an affair with an artist named Sandro Valera, the semi-estranged scion of an Italian tire and motorcycle empire. When they visited Sandro’s family home in Italy, Reno fell in with members of the radical movement that overtook Italy in the seventies. Betrayal sent her reeling into a clandestine undertow.

Set four decades later, The Blazing World tells the provocative story of New York-based artist Harriet Burden. After years of watching her work ignored or dismissed by critics, Burden conducts an experiment she calls “Maskings” she presents her own art behind three male masks, concealing her female identity. 

The three solo shows are successful, but when Burden finally steps forward triumphantly to reveal herself as the artist behind the exhibitions, there are critics who doubt her. The public scandal turns on the final exhibition, initially shown as the work of acclaimed artist Rune, who denies Burden’s role in its creation. What no one doubts, however, is that the two artists were intensely involved with each other. As Burden’s journals reveal, she and Rune found themselves locked in a charged and dangerous game that ended with the man’s bizarre death. 

Ingeniously presented as a collection of texts compiled after Burden’s death, The Blazing World unfolds from multiple perspectives. The exuberant Burden speaks—in all her joy and fury—through extracts from her own notebooks, while critics, fans, family members, and others offer their own conflicting opinions of who she was, and where the truth lies. 

From one of the most ambitious and internationally renowned writers of her generation, The Blazing World is a polyphonic tour de force. An intricately conceived, diabolical puzzle, it explores the deceptive powers of prejudice, money, fame, and desire. Emotionally intense, intellectually rigorous, ironic, and playful, Hustvedt’s new novel follows in the great wake of Kusher’s The Flamethrowers, with its engaging exploration of the mystique of the feminine, the fake, the terrorist. 

March 19, 2014
I don’t want to be a time travel snob, but if I’d curated this compendium I’d probably have included at least one author from the future.

I don’t want to be a time travel snob, but if I’d curated this compendium I’d probably have included at least one author from the future.

March 15, 2014
mcnallyperiodicals:

SLICE, Spring/Summer 2014

THE FEBRUARYIST by Peter Money
It comes to a nest made
of books. A figure & a syllable,
a cat above the head, an orange
tinge of clothing, water in the shoes
waiting almost impatiently outside
the theater, the “Bright Star” fallen
or gone to another city, red plaid
hunter who does not fight but gathers
keeps a nasty mouth & piles on standby,
of passionate insistence through moth holes
in the eyes of dollars, the same cloth worn yet a good life
better than many and most, still on the down-low
some things that can’t be believed, believed.
We are breathing in the same cosmos in the same epoch
an antiquarian’s garden strewn in the compost of hip-
hop and only a finite sleep, cookies and popcorn
we pack groceries on top of two calendars
and ring our flesh on the progress of progeny
we had bought, after bread, broke on a table
to the tide of what turned us on,
salt lick by wave spray, a bounty of chaotic fullness
we can’t measure by efficiencies but by vast and direct
achievements of little, the economy of gifts
agreed, enjoyed, a four wheel circus of textures
we read before collapsing.

mcnallyperiodicals:

SLICE, Spring/Summer 2014

THE FEBRUARYIST by Peter Money

It comes to a nest made

of books. A figure & a syllable,

a cat above the head, an orange

tinge of clothing, water in the shoes

waiting almost impatiently outside

the theater, the “Bright Star” fallen

or gone to another city, red plaid

hunter who does not fight but gathers

keeps a nasty mouth & piles on standby,

of passionate insistence through moth holes

in the eyes of dollars, the same cloth worn yet a good life

better than many and most, still on the down-low

some things that can’t be believed, believed.

We are breathing in the same cosmos in the same epoch

an antiquarian’s garden strewn in the compost of hip-

hop and only a finite sleep, cookies and popcorn

we pack groceries on top of two calendars

and ring our flesh on the progress of progeny

we had bought, after bread, broke on a table

to the tide of what turned us on,

salt lick by wave spray, a bounty of chaotic fullness

we can’t measure by efficiencies but by vast and direct

achievements of little, the economy of gifts

agreed, enjoyed, a four wheel circus of textures

we read before collapsing.

March 15, 2014
mcnallyperiodicals:

Some of these art directors really earn their money. FRIEZE, March 2014.

mcnallyperiodicals:

Some of these art directors really earn their money. FRIEZE, March 2014.

March 14, 2014

Does anybody else see this book and immediately start hearing the Mortal Kombat music and imagining what the combatant’s respective Fatalities would be? (MFA finishes you with ambiguous endings and dramatic irony, NYC with high rents and alcoholism.)

March 12, 2014
housingworksbookstore:

downtownliteraryfestival:

Poster by Bianca Stone.

It’s BACK! We’ve been scheming with mcnallyjackson and details coming very soon, follow @downtownliteraryfestival and be first to know.

Downtown! Everything lit is DOWNTOWN, check out this stuff it’s DOWNTOWN, get on it now it’s DOWNTOWN.

housingworksbookstore:

downtownliteraryfestival:

Poster by Bianca Stone.

It’s BACK! We’ve been scheming with mcnallyjackson and details coming very soon, follow @downtownliteraryfestival and be first to know.

Downtown! Everything lit is DOWNTOWN, check out this stuff it’s DOWNTOWN, get on it now it’s DOWNTOWN.

March 11, 2014

March 10, 2014
March YA Signed Book Offers

mcnallykids:

We have an amazing YA events lineup this month with Sarah Mlynowksi, Lauren Oliver, and our NYC Teen Author Festival panel. If you’re unable to attend, you can get signed & personalized copies of the books offered via our website: 

Order a personalized copy of Lauren Oliver’s Panic 

Order a personalized copy of Sarah Mlynowski’s Don’t Even Think About It 

Order a personalized copy of Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor & Park 

Order a personalized copy of Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl

You YA-ists follow Stickles and our kids tumblr, right? Good. Carry on.

March 8, 2014

mcnallyperiodicals:

CREATIVE NONFICTION, "The Human Face of Sustainability" issue. Original, dramatic essays that communicate the challenges inherent to the complicated and vital issue of sustainability. "Moms, scientists, farmers, and others who are trying to change the world…” Colleagues at McJack have always revered Creative Nonfiction, and it is issues like this that really justify that adoration. Hurrah.

March 8, 2014

“An astonishing novel. We had to wait half a century for a female Humbert. It was worth it.” -John Niven

6:31pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZDtOFy19aX9aU
  
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