September 12, 2014
Join former New Yorker columnist and preeminent critic Daphne Merkin for a reading from The Fame Lunches, a fearless, darkly observant, refreshingly incautious collection of essays that examines faded icons, famous writers, and our collective fascination with celebrity. Merkin will be joined in conversation by Sasha Weiss, literary editor of newyorker.com.
"Daphne Merkin’s sparkling and unreasonably informed essays are about fame, yes, and lunches, somewhat. Above all, they are strikingly original takes on the human condition."—Woody Allen

Join former New Yorker columnist and preeminent critic Daphne Merkin for a reading from The Fame Lunches, a fearless, darkly observant, refreshingly incautious collection of essays that examines faded icons, famous writers, and our collective fascination with celebrity. Merkin will be joined in conversation by Sasha Weiss, literary editor of newyorker.com.

"Daphne Merkin’s sparkling and unreasonably informed essays are about fame, yes, and lunches, somewhat. Above all, they are strikingly original takes on the human condition."—Woody Allen

September 12, 2014
Join Joseph O’Neill, author of the acclaimed Netherland, for a reading from his new Booker-nominated novel The Dog, which shifts Netherland's themes of alienation and rootlessness from post 9/11 Manhattan to Dubai. The Dog's narrator is an unnamed New York attorney who flees to the glittering emirate to work as a legal financial factotum for the wealthy Lebanese family of a college friend—and to get over a failed relationship. Weaved into a portrait of Dubai's gauche modernity is a novel of high comedy and dazzlingly compelling intelligence about servitude, loneliness, and cultural dislocation. Tues 9/16, 7pm.

Join Joseph O’Neill, author of the acclaimed Netherland, for a reading from his new Booker-nominated novel The Dog, which shifts Netherland's themes of alienation and rootlessness from post 9/11 Manhattan to Dubai. The Dog's narrator is an unnamed New York attorney who flees to the glittering emirate to work as a legal financial factotum for the wealthy Lebanese family of a college friend—and to get over a failed relationship. Weaved into a portrait of Dubai's gauche modernity is a novel of high comedy and dazzlingly compelling intelligence about servitude, loneliness, and cultural dislocation. Tues 9/16, 7pm.

September 12, 2014
mcnallyperiodicals:

We’re excited to have finally gotten in, after many, many entreaties and much finagling, CHIMURENGA CHRONIC, a pan-African gazette of the “now-now”. Internationally produced, its genesis is South African, with cultural funding from Germany. From their own lips:

"…a publication borne out of an urgent need to write our world differently, to begin asking new questions, or even the old ones anew. When will the new emerge – and if it is already here, how do we decipher it? In which ways do people live their lives with joy and creativity and beauty, sometimes amid suffering and violence, and sometimes perpendicular to it? How do people fashion routines and make sense of the world in the face of the temporariness or volatility that defines so many of the arrangements of social existence here? These questions loom over a contemporary Africa. Yet most knowledge produced on the continent remains heavily reliant on simplistic and rigid categories unable to capture the complexities that inflect so much of contemporary quotidian life here."

So, in addition to a robust book supplement insert, there are thoughtful pieces on Apartheid litigation (and its effects), the “throwing of shit” in protests, “critical futurity”, “philatelic time travel” (and postage stamps) in film, and a profound, blistering piece by Youssef Rakha on events in Egypt. And MORE, MORE, MORE. Read Chimurenga Chronic, do….

mcnallyperiodicals:

We’re excited to have finally gotten in, after many, many entreaties and much finagling, CHIMURENGA CHRONIC, a pan-African gazette of the “now-now”. Internationally produced, its genesis is South African, with cultural funding from Germany. From their own lips:

"…a publication borne out of an urgent need to write our world differently, to begin asking new questions, or even the old ones anew. When will the new emerge – and if it is already here, how do we decipher it? In which ways do people live their lives with joy and creativity and beauty, sometimes amid suffering and violence, and sometimes perpendicular to it? How do people fashion routines and make sense of the world in the face of the temporariness or volatility that defines so many of the arrangements of social existence here? These questions loom over a contemporary Africa. Yet most knowledge produced on the continent remains heavily reliant on simplistic and rigid categories unable to capture the complexities that inflect so much of contemporary quotidian life here."

So, in addition to a robust book supplement insert, there are thoughtful pieces on Apartheid litigation (and its effects), the “throwing of shit” in protests, “critical futurity”, “philatelic time travel” (and postage stamps) in film, and a profound, blistering piece by Youssef Rakha on events in Egypt. And MORE, MORE, MORE. Read Chimurenga Chronic, do….

September 12, 2014
I wish they’d let these McEwans dry before they shipped them to us; they’re making a mess.

I wish they’d let these McEwans dry before they shipped them to us; they’re making a mess.

September 11, 2014
McNally Jackson Master Class: Peter Mendelsund

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By now you know that Peter Mendelsund is visiting us on 9/15 as part of our Conversations on Practice series with Glenn Kurtz. In anticipation, Matt sought him out to ask him a few questions, and Peter graciously obliged. See below what he has to say about how visualize what we read, the humorous mistakes even a terrific designer can make, and what book cover has most grabbed his attention this year. 

Peter’s two (!) new books are What We See When We Read and CoverPlease come and see him next Monday night, at 7pm. For free, of course.

Thanks, Peter!

Read More

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Filed under: mendelsund 
September 11, 2014
Join Ben Lerner to celebrate his new novel 10:04—about time travel, art-making, and how baby octopi can help us understand global capitalism. Of the book, Maggie Nelson writes: “A generous, provocative, ambitious Chinese box of a novel, 10:04 is a near-perfect piece of literature, affirmative of both life and art, written with the full force of Lerner’s intellectual, aesthetic, and empathetic powers, which are as considerable as they are vitalizing.” Lerner will be joined in conversation by Lorin Stein, editor of The Paris Review.

Join Ben Lerner to celebrate his new novel 10:04—about time travel, art-making, and how baby octopi can help us understand global capitalism. Of the book, Maggie Nelson writes: “A generous, provocative, ambitious Chinese box of a novel, 10:04 is a near-perfect piece of literature, affirmative of both life and art, written with the full force of Lerner’s intellectual, aesthetic, and empathetic powers, which are as considerable as they are vitalizing.” Lerner will be joined in conversation by Lorin Stein, editor of The Paris Review.

September 9, 2014
Join our friends 53rd State Press and Big Dance Theater to launch their most ambitious title to date, Another Telepathic Thing. The book is an expanded documentation of Big Dance Theater’s piece of the same name, which combined Mark Twain’s novella “The Mysterious Stranger,” illicitly recorded audition tapes, several parasols, and many other ingenious things. Join moderator and downtown theater big daddy Mac Wellman along with BDT founder Paul Lazar, editor Karinne Keithley Syers, and BDT company members  Molly Hickok, Tymberley Canale, and Cynthia Hopkins for a reading from the text and and a discussion of making both the book and the original piece, as well as performances of original music from ATT by Cynthia Hopkins. The evening will close with a screening of excerpts from Jonathan Demme’s just-finished film of the production. To wit: holey-moley. 
The event also coincides with Big Dance Theater’s show appearing soon at BAM, Alan Smithee Directed This Play.
We already know that you’ll come; that’s how telepathy works.

Join our friends 53rd State Press and Big Dance Theater to launch their most ambitious title to date, Another Telepathic Thing. The book is an expanded documentation of Big Dance Theater’s piece of the same name, which combined Mark Twain’s novella “The Mysterious Stranger,” illicitly recorded audition tapes, several parasols, and many other ingenious things. Join moderator and downtown theater big daddy Mac Wellman along with BDT founder Paul Lazar, editor Karinne Keithley Syers, and BDT company members  Molly Hickok, Tymberley Canale, and Cynthia Hopkins for a reading from the text and and a discussion of making both the book and the original piece, as well as performances of original music from ATT by Cynthia Hopkins. The evening will close with a screening of excerpts from Jonathan Demme’s just-finished film of the production. To wit: holey-moley. 

The event also coincides with Big Dance Theater’s show appearing soon at BAM, Alan Smithee Directed This Play.

We already know that you’ll come; that’s how telepathy works.

September 8, 2014

Richard Flanagan and Patrick McGrath paid us a visit last week. For those who missed it, here’s the whole thing.

September 7, 2014
newyorker:

Molly Fischer on Elena Ferrante and friendship:

"Childhood friendships of the kind I’m describing are like the primordial soup of human relationships, messy and unformed but with the raw parts to make anything that might come after. Such friends are like family (you need, or hate, or cannot forsake them) and a beloved (you are so jealous, so sensitive to their slights!) and an alternative (better?) self, squashed into one. And Ferrante’s subject is exactly this sort of friendship."

Photograph by Trent Parke/Magnum

newyorker:

Molly Fischer on Elena Ferrante and friendship:

"Childhood friendships of the kind I’m describing are like the primordial soup of human relationships, messy and unformed but with the raw parts to make anything that might come after. Such friends are like family (you need, or hate, or cannot forsake them) and a beloved (you are so jealous, so sensitive to their slights!) and an alternative (better?) self, squashed into one. And Ferrante’s subject is exactly this sort of friendship."

Photograph by Trent Parke/Magnum

September 6, 2014

Anonymous said: For the 9/10 Stephanie Perkins/Gayle Foreman event do you have to buy tickets, or is it just a walk in thing?

Just a walk in thing — no tickets. We’re even going to give you cookies. Check it.

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Filed under: events 
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