September 5, 2014

Dear Random House,

A back cover author photo is fine, but we think it’s time you gave David Mitchell the full jacket. 

Sincerely,

McNally Jackson Books

PS - Don’t shoot the messenger. We’re just saying what everyone else is thinking.

September 5, 2014
"This is the sensation that I recognized in reading Ferrante: a hungry, relentless urge to keep going, the same feeling that drives you to borrow all someone’s clothes, or pinch them as hard as you can when they don’t understand you."

Excellent piece on Elena Ferrante, friendship, the bogus idea of “likability,” and how it feels to read Ferrante by Molly Fischer for newyorker's Page-Turner.

September 4, 2014
"The words of my book nothing, the drift of it everything."

— Walt Whitman (via pantheonbooks)

(via skylightbooks)

September 4, 2014
Profoundly talented novelist Donald Antrim proves to be just as skillful in short form as long. Sliding in and out of realism and fairytale, his new collection of short stories, The Emerald Light in the Air, movingly observes romantic failure and unravelling anxiety with a candid tenderness. “What is it about Antrim?” writes Lorin Stein. “He writes as if prose were his native language: his sentences have the matter-of-fact pathos and absurdity of dreams.” Antrim will be joined in conversation by his editor Mitzi Angel, publisher of Faber and Faber.

Profoundly talented novelist Donald Antrim proves to be just as skillful in short form as long. Sliding in and out of realism and fairytale, his new collection of short stories, The Emerald Light in the Air, movingly observes romantic failure and unravelling anxiety with a candid tenderness. “What is it about Antrim?” writes Lorin Stein. “He writes as if prose were his native language: his sentences have the matter-of-fact pathos and absurdity of dreams.” Antrim will be joined in conversation by his editor Mitzi Angel, publisher of Faber and Faber.

September 4, 2014
We’re pleased to announce that we’re helping our friends over at The Baffler present a debate between David Graeber (Debt) and Peter Thiel (Zero to One, forthcoming), entitled “No Future For You!” 
Once upon a time, in the heyday of social prognostication, many Americans believed that gadget-related knowledge would surely yield immeasurable leaps forward in the progress of the human species. Yet as David Graeber argued in his famous Baffler essay, “Of Flying Cars and the Declining Rate of Profit,” Information-Age capitalism has mainly given us better ways to shop—and handed the government unprecendented opportunities to watch. Was the gilded promise of innovation a con game all along? What does Peter Thiel, the renowned Silicon Valley author and investor, think about the reality of technological progress? How do Thiel’s libertarian principles stand in relation to Graeber’s revolutionary anarchism? Come, see the future vanish—and possibly reconstitute itself—before your very eyes!
The event is Friday 9/19. Further details here. 

We’re pleased to announce that we’re helping our friends over at The Baffler present a debate between David Graeber (Debt) and Peter Thiel (Zero to One, forthcoming), entitled “No Future For You!” 

Once upon a time, in the heyday of social prognostication, many Americans believed that gadget-related knowledge would surely yield immeasurable leaps forward in the progress of the human species. Yet as David Graeber argued in his famous Baffler essay, “Of Flying Cars and the Declining Rate of Profit,” Information-Age capitalism has mainly given us better ways to shop—and handed the government unprecendented opportunities to watch. Was the gilded promise of innovation a con game all along? What does Peter Thiel, the renowned Silicon Valley author and investor, think about the reality of technological progress? How do Thiel’s libertarian principles stand in relation to Graeber’s revolutionary anarchism? Come, see the future vanish—and possibly reconstitute itself—before your very eyes!

The event is Friday 9/19. Further details here

September 4, 2014
"Everything Jacob Wren touches interests me, excites me,” says Lynne Tillman. His most recent novel, Polyamorous Love Song, touches on art, politics, violence, sexuality, and love; also, furry mascots, friendly competition, physical loneliness, Führer bestiality, and an everyday life art movement called “New Filmmaking.” The book’s cast of characters make and think in art; Wren writes their work into his work. The resulting narrative is poly—polyvocal, polysemic, polymorphously perverse, and, indeed, polyamorous. 
Jacob Wren will be joined in conversation with writer and scholar McKenzie Wark, author of A Hacker Manifesto, Gamer Theory, and The Spectacle of Disintegration, and The Beach Beneath the Street: The Everyday Life and Glorious Times of the Situationist International.

"Everything Jacob Wren touches interests me, excites me,” says Lynne Tillman. His most recent novel, Polyamorous Love Song, touches on art, politics, violence, sexuality, and love; also, furry mascots, friendly competition, physical loneliness, Führer bestiality, and an everyday life art movement called “New Filmmaking.” The book’s cast of characters make and think in art; Wren writes their work into his work. The resulting narrative is poly—polyvocal, polysemic, polymorphously perverse, and, indeed, polyamorous. 

Jacob Wren will be joined in conversation with writer and scholar McKenzie Wark, author of A Hacker Manifesto, Gamer Theory, and The Spectacle of Disintegration, and The Beach Beneath the Street: The Everyday Life and Glorious Times of the Situationist International.

September 2, 2014
As we struggle to figure out how to notch back the degrees, so as to mitigate the suffering that a warming planet is going to bring, we also need to figure out forms of relationality — both to ourselves and to each other — that won’t make things worse.
By the time I finished 10:04, I felt I knew some: not being ashamed of the desire to make a living doing what we love, while also daring to imagine “art before or after capital”; paying as intense attention to our collectivity as to our individuality; demanding a politics based on more than reproductive futurism, without belittling the daily miracle of conception, nor the labor and mysterious promise of child bearing and rearing; attempting to listen seriously to others, especially those who differ profoundly from ourselves, no matter how pre-contaminated the attempts; spending time reading and writing poetry; and more. Far from despair, I felt flooded with the sense that everything mattered, from meticulous descriptions of individual works of art to kissing the forehead of a passed-out intern to analyzing our political language to documenting the sensual details of our daily lives to bagging dried mangoes to the creation of the book I was holding in my hand to my deciding to spend some time writing a review of it. “The earth is beautiful beyond all change,” Lerner repeats in 10:04, quoting the poet William Bronk. The inspired and inspiring accomplishment of his novel makes me want to say that, sometimes, art is too. And maybe — if incredibly — so might we be, ourselves.


McJ favorite Maggie Nelson (Bluets, Jane) reviews Ben Lerner’s 10:04, and it’s wonderful.

As we struggle to figure out how to notch back the degrees, so as to mitigate the suffering that a warming planet is going to bring, we also need to figure out forms of relationality — both to ourselves and to each other — that won’t make things worse.

By the time I finished 10:04, I felt I knew some: not being ashamed of the desire to make a living doing what we love, while also daring to imagine “art before or after capital”; paying as intense attention to our collectivity as to our individuality; demanding a politics based on more than reproductive futurism, without belittling the daily miracle of conception, nor the labor and mysterious promise of child bearing and rearing; attempting to listen seriously to others, especially those who differ profoundly from ourselves, no matter how pre-contaminated the attempts; spending time reading and writing poetry; and more. Far from despair, I felt flooded with the sense that everything mattered, from meticulous descriptions of individual works of art to kissing the forehead of a passed-out intern to analyzing our political language to documenting the sensual details of our daily lives to bagging dried mangoes to the creation of the book I was holding in my hand to my deciding to spend some time writing a review of it. “The earth is beautiful beyond all change,” Lerner repeats in 10:04, quoting the poet William Bronk. The inspired and inspiring accomplishment of his novel makes me want to say that, sometimes, art is too. And maybe — if incredibly — so might we be, ourselves.

McJ favorite Maggie Nelson (Bluets, Jane) reviews Ben Lerner’s 10:04and it’s wonderful.

(Source: fifidunks)

September 2, 2014

September 2, 2014
"The grant has yet to be given a name, ‘in case a nice philanthropist hears about this and would like to lend their name and support to the project’, but Catton said that the word which keeps coming to her as a possibility ‘is the horoeka, or lancewood, a native tree that begins its life defensively, with sharp rigid leaves and a narrow bearing, and at a certain point transforms into a shape that is confident, open and entirely new – so different, in fact, that the young and old versions of the tree look absolutely unalike. That is what I believe that reading can do.’"

Booker-winning Eleanor Catton is putting money from her latest award win towards establishing a grant that will give writers “time to read”.

1:12pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZDtOFy1PrhNoa
  
Filed under: Eleanor Catton 
August 30, 2014
Easy: ree ree ree ree.

Easy: ree ree ree ree.

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