September 2, 2014
"The grant has yet to be given a name, ‘in case a nice philanthropist hears about this and would like to lend their name and support to the project’, but Catton said that the word which keeps coming to her as a possibility ‘is the horoeka, or lancewood, a native tree that begins its life defensively, with sharp rigid leaves and a narrow bearing, and at a certain point transforms into a shape that is confident, open and entirely new – so different, in fact, that the young and old versions of the tree look absolutely unalike. That is what I believe that reading can do.’"

Booker-winning Eleanor Catton is putting money from her latest award win towards establishing a grant that will give writers “time to read”.

1:12pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZDtOFy1PrhNoa
  
Filed under: Eleanor Catton 
August 30, 2014
Easy: ree ree ree ree.

Easy: ree ree ree ree.

August 30, 2014
I’m terribly uninterested in all of this end of summer business—mostly because I’m morally opposed to the end of the best season of all time. But if it’s gotta end, at least let it end while you’re surrounded by exceptional poets, in gorgeous surroundings, possibly joined by parrots and wood sprites. Join us for the last day of the hottest month, for the last Poets in the Garden, and the last searing quintet: Corina Copp, Leopoldine Core, Sarah Gerard, Jocelyn Spaar, Jacqueline Waters.

Facebook event here. 
Poets in the Garden is a summertime reading series hosted by McNally Jackson Books. Each monthly event features the work of five women writing poetry in New York.CORINA COPP’s recent books include a first full-length collection, The Green Ray, forthcoming from Ugly Duckling Presse, and the pamphlet ALL STOCK MUST GO (Shit Valley Verlag, Cambridge, UK, 2014). Other work can be found in BOMB, Boston Review, The Claudius App, and elsewhere. She’s currently working on a three-part play inspired by the successive forms of the work of Marguerite Duras, entitled The Whole Tragedy of the Inability to Love. Excerpts have been presented at the NYC Prelude Festival, Dixon Place, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. She is a curator at the Segue Foundation, and lives in Brooklyn.LEOPOLDINE CORE was born and raised in Manhattan. Her poems and fiction have appeared in Apology, Open City, The Literarian, The Brooklyn Rail, Big Lucks and elsewhere. Her chapbook “Young Friend” was published by Perfect Lovers Press. Her first full-length book is forthcoming from Coconut Books.SARAH GERARD is the author of the chapbook Things I Told My Mother and the forthcoming novel, Binary Star. Short works have appeared in the New York Times, Joyland, Bookforum, the LA Review of Books, the Paris Review Daily and other journals. She holds an MFA from The New School and works at BOMB Magazine.JOCELYN SPAAR’s translations, poems, and drawings have appeared in the Paris Review Daily, The Paper Nautilus, Vice, Bridge Journal, Stonecutter, and Storychord. She has translated work for New Directions and Archipelago and has exhibited her drawings, films, and text-art installations at the Bridge PAI, the 2ANNAS film festival, and elsewhere. One time she won a hamburger-eating contest.JACQUELINE WATERS is the author of One Sleeps the Other Doesn’t (Ugly Duckling Presse) and A Minute without Danger (Adventures in Poetry). Recent poems have appeared in Fanzine, The American Reader and Everyday Genius. She edits The Physiocrats, a pamphlet press.

I’m terribly uninterested in all of this end of summer business—mostly because I’m morally opposed to the end of the best season of all time. But if it’s gotta end, at least let it end while you’re surrounded by exceptional poets, in gorgeous surroundings, possibly joined by parrots and wood sprites. Join us for the last day of the hottest month, for the last Poets in the Garden, and the last searing quintet: Corina Copp, Leopoldine Core, Sarah Gerard, Jocelyn Spaar, Jacqueline Waters.

Facebook event here

Poets in the Garden is a summertime reading series hosted by McNally Jackson Books. Each monthly event features the work of five women writing poetry in New York.

CORINA COPP’s recent books include a first full-length collection, The Green Ray, forthcoming from Ugly Duckling Presse, and the pamphlet ALL STOCK MUST GO (Shit Valley Verlag, Cambridge, UK, 2014). Other work can be found in BOMB, Boston Review, The Claudius App, and elsewhere. She’s currently working on a three-part play inspired by the successive forms of the work of Marguerite Duras, entitled The Whole Tragedy of the Inability to Love. Excerpts have been presented at the NYC Prelude Festival, Dixon Place, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. She is a curator at the Segue Foundation, and lives in Brooklyn.

LEOPOLDINE CORE was born and raised in Manhattan. Her poems and fiction have appeared in Apology, Open City, The Literarian, The Brooklyn Rail, Big Lucks and elsewhere. Her chapbook “Young Friend” was published by Perfect Lovers Press. Her first full-length book is forthcoming from Coconut Books.

SARAH GERARD is the author of the chapbook Things I Told My Mother and the forthcoming novel, Binary Star. Short works have appeared in the New York Times, Joyland, Bookforum, the LA Review of Books, the Paris Review Daily and other journals. She holds an MFA from The New School and works at BOMB Magazine.

JOCELYN SPAAR’s translations, poems, and drawings have appeared in the Paris Review Daily, The Paper Nautilus, Vice, Bridge Journal, Stonecutter, and Storychord. She has translated work for New Directions and Archipelago and has exhibited her drawings, films, and text-art installations at the Bridge PAI, the 2ANNAS film festival, and elsewhere. One time she won a hamburger-eating contest.

JACQUELINE WATERS is the author of One Sleeps the Other Doesn’t (Ugly Duckling Presse) and A Minute without Danger (Adventures in Poetry). Recent poems have appeared in Fanzine, The American Reader and Everyday Genius. She edits The Physiocrats, a pamphlet press.

August 29, 2014

Does anybody else notice that if you take the first and third letter of every title on this display it anagrams out to “THE NSA  IS ALWAYS WATCHING” ?

August 29, 2014
Tim From Jurassic Park Applies To Paleontology Grad School

[…] there has been exactly nothing in my life to this point that hasn’t been impacted by my time spent on Jurassic Park: my wildly successful successful Capture the Flag defense strategy against a rival fraternity (they move in herds), my senior thesis about the future of paleontology seen through a feminist lens (dinosaurs eat man, woman inherits the earth), my insistence that my girlfriend and I abstain from sex to avoid an unwanted pregnancy despite her willingness to deploy multiple forms of birth control simultaneously (life finds a way).

Our Children’s & Young Adult Buyer, Cristin, has some time on her hands. See the full application letter at Bookriot.

August 28, 2014
mcnallyperiodicals:

ISRAEL and PALESTINE. Harper’s Magazine, September 2014. “Where to go from here.” A forum taken from a conversation at the Jerusalem YMCA on June 15th.With Bernard Avishai, Dani Dayan, Forsan Hussein, Eva Illouz, Bassim Khoury, Erel Margalit, Danny Rubinstein, and Khalil Shikaki.
PART ONE: “We live so close to each other, yet we know so little about each other.”
PART TWO: “We are not a fort. We are a hub.”
PART THREE: “Palestine is not Jordan.”
PART FOUR: “The Kerry Intifada.”

Matt seconds Periodicals: recommended reading.

mcnallyperiodicals:

ISRAEL and PALESTINE. Harper’s Magazine, September 2014. “Where to go from here.” A forum taken from a conversation at the Jerusalem YMCA on June 15th.

With Bernard Avishai, Dani Dayan, Forsan Hussein, Eva Illouz, Bassim Khoury, Erel Margalit, Danny Rubinstein, and Khalil Shikaki.

PART ONE: “We live so close to each other, yet we know so little about each other.”

PART TWO: “We are not a fort. We are a hub.”

PART THREE: “Palestine is not Jordan.”

PART FOUR: “The Kerry Intifada.”

Matt seconds Periodicals: recommended reading.

August 28, 2014
Join Richard Flanagan on September 3rd to launch The Narrow Road to the Deep North, his Booker-nominated novel based on the experience of an Australian man in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp on the 1943 Thai-Burma death railway. Oscillating between scenes of relentless violence and the desolations of war’s aftermath, the novel preserves, improbably, the possibility of redemption—in love, in friendship, in literature. The Guardian calls it “a high point in an already distinguished career” for Flanagan, whose other books include Gould’s Book of Fish and The Sound of One Hand Clapping. Flanagan will be joined in conversation by novelist Patrick McGrath (Constance), who calls The Narrow Road to the Deep North “a big, magnificent novel of passion and horror.”
Landon is currently reading The Narrow Road to the Deep North. "So far, it’s good," he says. "Lots of malaria." 

Join Richard Flanagan on September 3rd to launch The Narrow Road to the Deep North, his Booker-nominated novel based on the experience of an Australian man in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp on the 1943 Thai-Burma death railway. Oscillating between scenes of relentless violence and the desolations of war’s aftermath, the novel preserves, improbably, the possibility of redemption—in love, in friendship, in literature. The Guardian calls it “a high point in an already distinguished career” for Flanagan, whose other books include Gould’s Book of Fish and The Sound of One Hand Clapping. Flanagan will be joined in conversation by novelist Patrick McGrath (Constance), who calls The Narrow Road to the Deep North “a big, magnificent novel of passion and horror.”

Landon is currently reading The Narrow Road to the Deep North"So far, it’s good," he says. "Lots of malaria." 

August 28, 2014
On September 2nd, join Justin Taylor, whose newest collection of stories, Flings, Alice Nutting describes as possessing a “smarting beauty” which “rewards the reader with revelation time and time again,” and his friend Adam Wilson (What’s Important is Feeling), for a conversation about the existential crises that plague their characters. Part of McNally Jackson’s Literary BFFs series, hosted by David Gutowski (a.k.a. Largehearted Boy).

On September 2nd, join Justin Taylor, whose newest collection of stories, Flings, Alice Nutting describes as possessing a “smarting beauty” which “rewards the reader with revelation time and time again,” and his friend Adam Wilson (What’s Important is Feeling), for a conversation about the existential crises that plague their characters. Part of McNally Jackson’s Literary BFFs series, hosted by David Gutowski (a.k.a. Largehearted Boy).

August 26, 2014

Our staff loves Spector Books' Four Times Through the Labyrinth. Pictured above: Ames staff picks it. And here Fiona reviews it:

Through the Labyrinth performs entanglement. One slide will connect to another two lectures later. Sometimes images are repeated. Pantomiming its subject, the book’s contents diverge and loop.

David’s game for it too. 

August 26, 2014
Here is the email Cristin wrote to the bookstore's staff today.

Cristin crushing how well Kate is crushing it.

mcnallykids:

image

You’ve all spent enough time with me at this point to know I’d rather chew glass than pretend to like something that I don’t, so I hope you realize that what I’m about to say is not just blowing smoke up Kate’s ass to be nice.

Kate’s new book, Greenglass House, is out today, and it is easily one of the best middle grade novels of 2014. In case you need a second opinion, the head of children’s collections for the NYPL has already named it a strong contender for the Newbery, which is the children’s book equivalent of Scorsese going “someone should give that kid an Oscar.”

There’s a copy of the book on the lunch counter in the office labeled STAFF COPY- READ ME. I would love for you to read a few pages (or more) as your break/ section time allows, and for you to join me in enthusiastically recommending it to our middle grade (ages 8ish-12ish) customers.

Kate’s launch party is here at the store tonight. There’s cake involved.

-CRISTIN 

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