August 2, 2014

Now in store, (summer 2014 Artforum cover) artist Julien Ceccaldi picks some of his favorite novels, comics, theory, and films — among them, Virginie Despentes’ King Kong Theory, Catherine Breillat’s Fat Girl, Moto Hagio’s Heart of Thomas, and Shigeru Mizuki’s NonNonBa. Also available: a limited supply of signed copies of Ceccaldi’s Comics Collection 2010-2013.   

Cool.

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Filed under: Julien Ceccaldi 
August 1, 2014
"Relatability—a logism so neo that it’s not even recognized by the 2008 iteration of Microsoft Word with which these words are being written—has become widely and unthinkingly accepted as a criterion of value, even by people who might be expected to have more sophisticated critical tools at their disposal."

— Rebecca Mead on the scourge of “relatability” for the New Yorker.

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Filed under: we recommend 
July 31, 2014
Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay by Elena Ferrante Chapter 1

New writing from Ms. Ferrante, if you’re nasty. 

europaeditions:

I saw Lila for the last time five years ago, in the winter of 2005. We were walking along the stradone, early in the morning and, as had been true for years now, were unable to feel at ease. I was the only one talking, I remember: she was humming, she greeted people who didn’t respond, the rare…

July 31, 2014
Haruki Murakami on how your jazz collection can help you become a Nobel Prize contender.

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From a 2007 essay published in The New York Times, tracked down by our resident jazz aficionado and ascendant rock star, Shuja: 

"Whether in music or in fiction, the most basic thing is rhythm. Your style needs to have good, natural, steady rhythm, or people won’t keep reading your work. I learned the importance of rhythm from music — and mainly from jazz. Next comes melody — which, in literature, means the appropriate arrangement of the words to match the rhythm. If the way the words fit the rhythm is smooth and beautiful, you can’t ask for anything more. Next is harmony — the internal mental sounds that support the words. Then comes the part I like best: free improvisation. Through some special channel, the story comes welling out freely from inside. All I have to do is get into the flow. Finally comes what may be the most important thing: that high you experience upon completing a work — upon ending your ‘performance’ and feeling you have succeeded in reaching a place that is new and meaningful. And if all goes well, you get to share that sense of elevation with your readers (your audience). That is a marvelous culmination that can be achieved in no other way."

Also: check out this excerpt from Murakami’s new novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, coming out—barring any storms of fish, worm-triggered earthquakes, or our collective tumble into an alternate world almost-but-not-quite-like our ownany minute now (August 12, to be exact). 

July 31, 2014

Fifty Shades of Nope.

July 30, 2014
Marguerite Duras on telling absolutely no one anything about what you’re writing, ever, until it’s done.

Words that equally support genius and mania: 

"I couldn’t talk about it, because the slightest intrusion into the book, the slightest ‘objective’ opinion would have erased everything, of that book. […] The illusion one has—entirely correct—of being the only one to have written what one has written, no matter if it’s worthless or marvelous. And when I read my reviews, most of the time I responded to the fact that people said it was like nothing else. In other words, that it reconnected with the initial solitude of the author.”

—Marguerite Duras, Writing.

July 30, 2014
"This insistence on everyone’s right to full and free human satisfaction was at the center of [Ellen Willis’s] politics from the get-go. How women were denied this satisfaction became her subject."

Over in Dissent, an excellent review by Emily Greenhouse of The Essential Ellen Willis, which, dare we say it, is…essential.

July 29, 2014
mcnallyperiodicals:

We’re not quite sure what IDEOLOGIE ("a triumph of style") is, but we have it (and kinda dig it): "A spectre is haunting the world—-the spectre of fashion. All the powers of white magic have entered into an unholy alliance to exorcise this spectre, to capture it, to learn to cast a glamour. Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding approach? In warfare, one’s helmet should have a panache. What we lack in veracity, we make up in ideologie." Compadres of n+1.

Get it, get on it, get with it.

mcnallyperiodicals:

We’re not quite sure what IDEOLOGIE ("a triumph of style") is, but we have it (and kinda dig it): "A spectre is haunting the world—-the spectre of fashion. All the powers of white magic have entered into an unholy alliance to exorcise this spectre, to capture it, to learn to cast a glamour. Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding approach? In warfare, one’s helmet should have a panache. What we lack in veracity, we make up in ideologie." Compadres of n+1.

Get it, get on it, get with it.

July 24, 2014
Just arrived: the first English translation of Pasolini’s revolutionary screenplay for his unmade film about the life of St. Paul, from Verso. Pairs well with Piketty, Agamben, or that vintage Ocean Pacific swag you nabbed at Buffalo Exchange.Oh, and a nice piece in The New Statesmen about Paul’s place in Pasolini’s thought.

Just arrived: the first English translation of Pasolini’s revolutionary screenplay for his unmade film about the life of St. Paul, from Verso. Pairs well with Piketty, Agamben, or that vintage Ocean Pacific swag you nabbed at Buffalo Exchange.

Oh, and a nice piece in The New Statesmen about Paul’s place in Pasolini’s thought.

July 24, 2014
Geoff Dyer on Buying Bullets

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If there’s one thing Geoff Dyer does well, it’s imagine what it would be like if Samuel Beckett scripted a film about American gangsters to be directed by David Mamet.

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